Oxford University Press Series in Practical and Professional Ethics

Edited by Robert Audi

Co-edited by Patrick E. Murphy

Sponsored by the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics

In cooperation with Oxford University Press, APPE publishes the Practical and Professional Ethics Series. The series editor is Robert Audi, University of Nebraska; co-editor is Patrick E. Murphy, Notre Dame. The series includes:

  • Practical Ethics: A Collection of Addresses and Essays, Henry Sidgwick, with an introduction by Sissela Bok, 1998
  • Thinking Like an Engineer: Studies in the Ethics of a Profession, Michael Davis, 1998
  • Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement, edited by Stephen Macedo, 1999
  • From Social Justice to Criminal Justice: Poverty and the Administration of Criminal Law, edited by William C. Heffernan and John Kleinig, 2000
  • Meaningful Work: Rethinking Professional Ethics, Mike W. Martin, 2000
  • Conflict of Interest in the Professions, Edited by Michael Davis and Andrew Stark, 2001
  • The Price of Truth: How Money Affects the Norms of Science, David B. Resnik, 2007
  • A Philosophical Approach to Journalism Ethics, Edited by Christopher Meyers,  2008

For a more complete description of each book, please see below.

Association members receive a 20% discount on all books in the Oxford Series. To place an order, call the Oxford University Press at 800-451-7556 and identify yourself as a member of the Association.

To see updates of the series, check the Oxford University Press web site at http://www.oup-usa.org/catalogs/general/series/Practical_and_Professional_Ethics.html

Oxford Series, Volume VIII

A Philosophical Approach to Journalism Ethics, Edited by Christopher Meyers,  2008

Since the introduction of radio and television news, journalism has gone through multiple transformations, each time being sustained by a commitment to basic values and best practices. Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach is a reminder, a defense and an elucidation of core journalistic values, with particular emphasis on the interplay of theory, conceptual analysis and practice. The book begins with a sophisticated model for ethical decision-making, one that connects classical theories with the central purposes of journalism. Top scholars from philosophy, journalism and communications offer essays on such topics as objectivity, privacy, confidentiality, conflict of interest, the history of journalism, online journalism, and the definition of a journalist. The result is a guide to ethically sound and socially justified journalism—in whatever form that practice emerges. Journalism Ethics will appeal to students and teachers of journalism ethics, as well as journalists and practical ethicists in general. Contributors: Jacqui Banaszynski, Jay Black, Sandy Borden, Clifford G. Christians, Renita Coleman, Stephanie Craft, Michael Davis, Rick Edmonds, Deni Elliott, Carrie Figdor, Candace Gauthier, Paul Martin Lester, Christopher Meyers, Julianne H. Newton, David Ozar, Patrick Lee Pleaisance, Aaron Quinn, Ian Richards, Jane Singer, Marty Steffens, Stephen J. A. Ward, Edward Wasserman, Herman Wasserman, Lee Wilkins, Wendy N. Wyatt, Rick Williams. Christopher Meyers is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Kegley Institute of Ethics at California State University, Bakersfield.

Oxford Series, Volume VII

The Price of Truth: How Money Affects the Norms of Science, David B. Resnik, 2007

Modern science is big business. Governments, universities, and corporations have invested billions of dollars in scientific and technological research in the hope of obtaining power and profit. For the most part, this investment has benefited science and society, leading to new discoveries, inventions, disciplines, specialties, jobs, and career opportunities. However, there is a dark side to the influx of money into science. Unbridled pursuit of financial gain in science can undermine scientific norms, such as objectivity, honesty, openness, respect for research participants, and social responsibility.
In The Price of Truth, David B. Resnik examines some of the important and difficult questions resulting from the financial and economic aspects of modern science. How does money affect scientific research? Have scientists become entrepreneurs bent on making money instead of investigators searching for the truth? How does the commercialization of research affect the public’s perception of science? Can scientists prevent money from corrupting the research enterprise? What types of rules, policies, and guidelines should scientists adopt to prevent financial interests from adversely affecting research and the public’s opinion of science?
Resnik investigates and analyzes the relationship between the pursuit of financial gain and pursuit of knowledge. He considers how money can affect the conduct of scientists, universities, government agencies, and corporations. He also explores how moral, social, and political values affect public and private funding of research. Finally, he proposes some policies for controlling, regulating, and monitoring financial interests in research and for counteracting money’s corrupting effects on science.

Oxford Series, Volume VI

Conflict of Interest in the Professions, Edited by Michael Davis and Andrew Stark, 2001

Conflicts of interest pose special problems for the professions. Even the appearance of a conflict of interest can undermine essential trust between professional and public. This volume is a comprehensive and accessible guide to the ramifications and problems associated with this important issue. It contains fifteen new essays by noted scholars, and covers topics in law, medicine, journalism, engineering, financial services, and others.

Oxford Series, Volume V

Meaningful Work: Rethinking Professional Ethics, Mike W. Martin, 2000

As commonly understood, professional ethics consists of shared duties and episodic dilemmas. In this pioneering new study, Martin challenges this “consensus paradigm” as he rethinks professional ethics to include personal commitments and ideals. Using examples from medicine, law, teaching, journalism, engineering, business and ministry, he explores how personal commitments motivate, guide and give meaning to work. By taking personal commitments seriously, he vastly expands professional ethics to include neglected issues in moral psychology, character and the virtues, self-fulfillment and self-betrayal, and the interplay of private and professional life. He begins with an exploration of the roles played by personal ideals in giving meaning to work, interpreting professional responsibilities, and inspiring voluntary service. He then discusses the ideals of caring about clients and professional distance and takes up issues surrounding the interplay of personal ideals and respect for organizational authority. Finally, he examines three dangers: character-linked violations of shared professional norms, betrayal of personal ideals, and loss of balance that causes burnout and harm to families.

Oxford Series, Volume IV

From Social Justice to Criminal Justice: Poverty and the Administration of Criminal Law, edited by William C. Heffernan and John Kleinig, 2000

The economically deprived come into contact with the criminal court system in sorely disproportionate numbers. Should economic deprivation then figure in the administration of criminal law? And if so, how? This collection of original, insightful essays explores such practical issues as heightened vulnerability, indigent representation, and rotten social background defenses; whether it is possible and warranted for deprivation to be accepted as a claim mitigating criminal liability; and whether and how the processes of criminal adjudication should be used to advance agendas of social justice. Contributors include legal and political philosophers Philip Pettit, George Fletcher and Jeremy Waldron.

Oxford Series, Volume III

Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement, edited by Stephen Macedo, 1999

The banner of deliberative democracy is attracting increasing numbers of supporters, in both the world’s older and newer democracies. The effort to renew democratic politics is widely seen as a reaction to the dominance of liberal constitutionalism. Many questions surround the new project, however. What does deliberative democracy stand for? What difference would deliberative practices make in the real world of political conflict and public policy design? What is the relationship between deliberative politics and liberal constitutional arrangements? In Deliberative Politics, an all-star cast of political, legal and moral commentators criticize, extend or provide alternatives to the hopeful model of democratic deliberations proposed by Dennis Thompson and Amy Gutmann in Democracy and Disagreement. Individual essays discuss the value and limits of moral deliberation in politics and take up practical policy issues such as abortion, affirmative action, and health care reform. The book concludes with a thoughtful response from Gutmann and Thompson.

Oxford Series, Volume II

Thinking Like an Engineer: Studies in the Ethics of a Profession, Michael Davis, 1998

                        Michael Davis, a leading figure in the study of professional ethics, offers here both a compelling exploration of engineering ethics and a philosophical analysis of engineering as a profession. After putting engineering in historical perspective, Davis turns to the Challenger space shuttle disaster to consider the complex relationship between engineering ideals and contemporary engineering practice. Here, Davis examines how social organization and technical requirements define how engineers should (and presumably do) think. Later chapters test his analysis of engineering judgement and autonomy empirically, engaging a range of social science research including a study of how engineers and managers work together in ten different companies.

Oxford Series, Volume I

Practical Ethics: A Collection of Addresses and Essays, Henry Sidgwick, with an introduction by Sissela Bok, 1998

A classic work in the field of practical and professional ethics, this collection of nine essays by English philosopher and educator Henry Sidgwick (1838-1900) was first published in 1898 and forms a vital complement to Sidgwick’s major treatise on moral theology, The Methods of Ethics. Reissued here as the first volume in a new series sponsored by the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, the book is composed chiefly of addresses to members of two ethical societies that Sidgwick helped to found in Cambridge and London in the 1880s.  Clear, taut, and lively, these essays demonstrate the compassion and calm reasonableness that Sidgwick brought to all his writings.  Introduction by noted ethicist Sissela Bok.


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